Sports

Tropica’dingue

In November 2015 I had the pleasure of partaking in Reunion’s 2nd edition of a very different race the – Tropica’dingue. Those whose who are familiar with this event, know that it roughly translates to lots of crazy people running around looking extremely ridiculous under a hot tropical sun.

It is however, a little more structured than that.

The race is 12kms long, full of obstacles, it’s done in teams and most importantly – everybody has to dress up! Start times are staggered in the aim of reducing human traffic jams at each obstacle. This was even more important for the second edition given that the number of participants had gone up from 900 in 2014 to 3,500 in 2015.

Before getting underway all participants are invited to take part in the official ‘warm-up’. This is a great opportunity to check out everyone’s costume. For me, this is by far the highlight of the day. The effort people go to is truly impressive. This year my team, team ‘Zourite’, decided to dress up as octopi. We were dressed in blue and had a dressmaker design and make a wig in the form of an octopus head equipped with eyes, tentacles and all. We achieved our goal of looking as silly as we could but were still outdone by many others!

The minions were quite a popular theme as were pirates, surfers (with actual surfboards), fireman, cowboys, men in actual nappies, penguin onesies, superheroes and much, much more.

My personal favourite were the Flying Scotsman. No idea if that was their team name but as they passed us during the race, the group of young lads were very proud to show us that they’d respected the tradition of wearing no underwear underneath the kilts!

The aim of the day is to a) have fun, b) dress up and look silly c) have some more fun! The beauty of the Tropica’dingue is that there are no prizes for finishing first. Everyone is just there to muck around. It’s also perfect for those who don’t typically do a lot of sport as you can walk the whole 12kms if you like. And if you really don’t want to complete an obstacle, you can just walk around it and proceed to the next one.

However, the obstacles are what make the race. Some are physically hard and require a good dose of teamwork, others are easy, some are just fun; dancing to loud music in a tent in the middle of nowhere, some are dirty; jumping into an enormous mud bath, but all are downright entertaining.

Anyway, I won’t give too much more away, you’ll just have to sign up for the 3rd edition to find out for yourselves!

Vocabulary

to partake – assister, participer
roughly – à peu près
to dress up – se déguiser
to stagger – étaler
to get underway – se lancer

costume – déguisement
by far – de loin
highlight – temps fort, moment le plus marquant
dressmaker – couturière
wig – perruque

as silly as – aussi débile que
outdone – faire mieux que
nappy – couche
onesie – combinaison intégral
lad – gars

underneath – sous
to muck around – faire l’imbécile
dirty – sale
downright – carrément, franchement
sign-up – s’inscrire

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Welcome to Mafate!

Welcome to another podcast from anglais.re. Here we are in Mafate, in the heart of Reunion Island. Mafate is one of the three ‘cirques’. There are no roads coming into Mafate – this is one of the beauties of the place, which means it’s very calm, very peaceful – until of course the helicopters arrive and I’m sure that during this recording there will be a couple of interruptions! But the helicopters are the only way for the people of Mafate to get access to provisions and supplies.

The main activity here is tourism. There are many gîtes, which is a Reunionese word for ‘guesthouse’, where people come – they hike across the cirque, they spend the night and have some wonderful food and drink in the company of locals here.

As far as population goes, there are eight hundred people living in Mafate across various different villages called ilets. I am currently in La Nouvelle, which is the largest of the villages. There are two hundred people living here. There is a school. There is a church. There is even a Jacuzzi which has been put into one of the guesthouses. For the school, the teachers come in on a Monday morning, spend the week here with the children and then leave on Friday afternoon.

To give you an idea of the size, as I said, there are two hundred people living here, and the next village further on is called Marla. There are fifty people approximately living in Marla. To give you an idea of those fifty people, there are 13 guesthouses already, which is the same as there are here in La Nouvelle in fact. Of course, in La Nouvelle the capacity is a lot greater – they can sleep a lot more people in the guesthouses.

I’ve been staying with the team of the Rélais de Mafate, run by Mathieu Cernot and his wonderful team. Here in Mafate today and yesterday I’ve been doing English language training, teaching them the basics in dealing with their tourists who don’t necessarily speak French. A lot of tourists come from Germany and from Switzerland, not so many British, but quite a few South Africans as well are coming in, and good news: there are more and more Chinese tourists coming in.

So I recommend you come in, visit the place. It’s only a two hour walk in fact, from the car park up the hill and down into the cirque of Mafate, across a beautiful place called La Plaine des Tamarins, and I really recommend it for a wonderful break away.

Vocabulary

heart = coeur
peaceful = tranquille
recording = enregistrement
supplies = provisions
hike = randonner

church = église
further = plus loin
already = déjà
deal with = gérer
hill = colline

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Dance Therapy

A little while ago when I was feeling homesick, I talked to you about not having as many opportunities for classes or activities on the island as I would back home in the US. This month, I had an experience that made realize that having 100 options is not the same as finding that one unique treasure…which has the same possibility of existing among the hundreds back at home than it does hidden away, nestled in the sand on a faraway place called Reunion Island.

This particular little treasure I’m talking about is a dance class called NIA in Boucan. Of course NIA exists (and maybe even originated??) in the US, but what really makes this class different is the teacher. Veronique exudes passion and energy in a way that could uplift even the saddest person in the world. 

This past weekend, Veronique was invited to give some dance courses during the Wellness Festival in Mauritius, and to prepare, she started taking English classes with me. For the past month, I entered her world of dance a few times a week. 

I’m definitely not a dancer, but as a theater student I had to have the ability to learn simple dance sequences in a short period of time. So while I can grasp easier rhythm and steps quickly, I am missing that natural grace, beauty and flow that I so admire in real dancers. All of that vanishes when you dance with Veronique. I don’t know how it’s possible, but when you dance with her, you really feel as elegant and free as she looks. Her energy is contagious and soon you aren’t thinking about how silly you look, you’re thinking about how great it feels to stretch your body in ways you haven’t done since you were about 7. If I had to describe NIA to someone who hadn’t seen it before, I would say it is a dancer’s version of yoga, tai chi, and martial arts. Like swimming without water. Like meditation in movement. 

I ended up going to the Wellness Festival in Mauritius and it was one of the coolest experiences of my life! We arrived Friday night and set up our tents under the stars. Saturday morning we started around 8 and every hour or so you had two or three classes to choose from; things like yoga, pilates, tai chi, singing, meditation, and of course, dance. There were tents set up where you could buy homemade vegetarian food and healthy drinks and desserts. There were tents offering massages, healing crystals, spiritual books, and everything else you could dream of in the wellness world. After lunch we bathed in the nearby waterfall, and at night we had live concerts by yogis playing instruments I never knew existed! Every second was a new breath of life.

Not surprisingly, Veronique’s dance classes were by far the most popular!! The first day, she guided about 60 people through a dance therapy class under the big tent. It was so powerful I get chills just thinking about it. I remember specifically this little stout old man dancing in the corner with this eyes closed, as if he had never moved his body so freely and was finally flying out of a cage that he had been in for maybe his whole life. 

On Sunday, Veronique’s NIA class got a standing ovation, and people even asked her to move to Mauritius! It was truly a testament to her unique and beautiful gift.

If you’re like me, and you’re looking for a hobby here…something different, something worth your precious time and money, I think you should come meet Veronique and try out a NIA class. I think all of us could benefit a lot by learning to let go and dance.

Vocabulary

homesick – nostalgique
to uplift – élever les sentiments
to grasp – comprendre
steps – pas
to look silly – avoir l’air ridicule

to stretch – tendre
set up – installé
to let go – se lâcher

Dance Wellness Therapy, Mauritius

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Football. Reunionese Style

It’s a well known fact, to those who know me, that I’m a football fan.  For as long as I can rememberI have followed, and mostly suffered, the fortunes of my favourite football team, Tottenham Hotspur, and my country, England.  When I lived in England I often went to matches to cheer the Spurs on.

Here in Réunion, to assauge my footy fix I regularly go to matches here.  The teams that play in the D1P, Réunion’s highest level league, attract about 500 fans.  It’s not many in comparison with crowds at the top games in England, but there are compensations.

A nice balmy evening in a small but well appointed stadium with coconut trees swaying and the Indian Ocean in the background is a complete change from the White Hart Lane stadium at the end of bustling Tottenham High Road.

Then there are the fans themselves.  A cross section of not just men but often entire families with mothers fathers and children watching their local teams.  The public courtesy, one of Réunion’s great strengths, is also evident.  I am often invited to shake hands with a fellow supporter, someone I’ve never met, but who wanting to reach his seat doesn’t push or shove, but with a kind « good evening » passes me before sitting down.

The price of a game is very affordable.  The entry ticket is 7€, a Dodo 2€ and a chicken and mustard baguette sandwich 3€.  All in 12€.  Prices for football today in England make me shudder with no change from 100€ for a seat, programme, and a soggy hot dog.

The football itself is amateur.  Honest competitive and direct.  Last week’s match between the Marsouins of St Leu and current league leaders Excelsior of St Joseph was no exception.  It soon became evident just why Marsouins are near the foot of the table and Excelsior are at the top.  After 20 minutes of competitive play Marsouins were undone by two goals scored in quick succession just before half time.  Much of the second half saw the Marsouins’ centre forward show his love of astronomy by repeatedly trying to place a football on the moon!  That said, i’ve known a few Tottenham Hotspur centre forwards with the same passion for outer space!

Saving face Marsouins did score a consolation goal just before the end with the aforementioned centre forward remembering Newton’s Law of Gravity and actually suceeding in keeping the ball down whilst scoring.

So, another pleasant evening with no one minding too much about the result, everyone making their way back to their cars and on home, and not one police officer in sight.

Vocabulary

To follow – suivre
To suffer – subir
The Spurs – Les Eperons (diminuitive d’Hotspur – L’Eperon chaud)
To push and shove – se bousculer, raler, pousser
Bustling – animé

Affordable – abordable
All in – tout compris
Soggy – mou, trempé
Undone – dé fait
Making their way back – reprendre le chemin de retour

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My First Mountain Race

I remember the very first time I went hiking. I was a 20 year old London girl living the island experience. Reunion was a real eye opener and falling in love with the island took no time: I learned to like beer while watching the sunset with friends who have since been part of my life, I discovered the sounds of Maloya which I love so much, I started appreciating a more laid-back attitude to life and even went on my first strike (which I actually enjoyed at that point). Everything was truly perfect.

And then I went on my first hike, to Mafate. Now, don’t get me wrong, it was a great experience.  But it was also a very confusing one for me. I was young and fit, and expected to march down to Mafate without any trouble, with spare time to have a chicken samosa and Dodo beer break every now and then. The first 15 minutes were ok, and then I just didn’t understand what was happening. I was out of breath, and felt like a one-year old taking her first steps on unknown territory. I actually remember watching my American friend, Bridget, who’d obviously been on hikes before, skip downhill and manoeuvre her New Balance trainers from rock to rock like it was child’s play.

As for me, I could completely understand why they laughed at Christopher Columbus for suggesting the world was round – it’s just so much easier when we’re on a flat surface! But I soldiered on, made it to Mafate, pretended it had been easy so my new boyfriend wouldn’t laugh at me, and drank as much Dodo as I could to forget the fact that I had to go uphill the next day.

So when last week I took part in my very first mountain race, the Cilaos Women Trail, which was 22km long, I couldn’t help but grin at the thought of that very first hike. My friend Cobie, who had had a similarly disastrous first hike and who was also doing the race, and I were both very touched at the thought of how far we had come.

The trail itself was amazing. There was such a good atmosphere, and hearing all these people cheer you on really does keep you going when it gets tough. I twisted my ankle somewhere in between the first and second checkpoints, but still managed to make it to the end, in 3h39. I felt so proud of myself!

I remember, only two years ago, thinking that all these people signing up to the Grand Raid and similar races were mad. I just couldn’t understand why they would put themselves through the physical and psychological strain.

But now I do understand: Reunion does that to you. This little island has the strange capacity to draw you into the most unlikely situations that bring the best out of you. Situations where you see yourself transitioning into someone you never thought you could be. Some say it has something to do with it being a volcanic island, I don’t know. All I know is that I’m glad to have experienced that transition from almost dying of a heart attack on my first hike, to doing the Cilaos Women Trail, and who knows what will come next…

Vocabulary

a real eye opener – un véritable révélation
laid-back attitude – attitude décontractée
actually – en fait
don’t get me wrong – Ne vous méprenez pas
fit – en bonne santé

skip – sauter
soldiered on – persévéré
grin – sourire
tough – difficile
checkpoint – point de contrôle

signing up – enregistrer
strain – tension
glad – heureux

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Jump-Start in Reunion

As cliché as it sounds, I will  say, my, oh my, how time flies! I can’t believe that a year has gone by since we first arrived here. How did this happen? How did I also hit the big 30, all at once? I still have a vivid memory of our first arrival at the Roland Garros Airport, the initial impressions of the island and our first Car Jaune ride to Saint Louis along the sinuous mountain roads.

In the past year, I’ve had the privilege of meeting many colourful personalities with gripping life stories from Reunion, France, England, Canada etc. It was a journey of self-discovery, with lots of introspection as I sought to find my way around socially, culturally and professionally. Like every other person who has relocated from one country to another, you will know that it’s no walk in the park, with plenty of high and low moments. However, it was really through meeting these people and listening to their life passions, decisions and interests that I was able to reaffirm my own; and inadvertently rewire my thoughts and expectations of myself.

It was only here that I took the time to pursue other interests. Not that anything was stopping me back home (apart from the lack of time), but it is most certainly the natural energy in Reunion that gets people upbeat about getting their feet wet in everything and carve out new life paths if they want to. The fact that people ‘take the time’ to ‘make the time’ (if this makes sense) (a) to think of other things outside of their careers and (b) prioritise quality of life over money and societal expectations. Funnily enough, it was only here that I tried  paragliding, meditating, diving, hiking, pottery and the list goes on. Suffice to say, I can proclaim that I recently jump-started my life, from simply being a cog in the wheel in the corporate world to becoming a trier of new experiences far away from home.

When you are jump-starting, you are basically starting a new life chapter in an active way while being open to different experiences. If you take a closer look at the people around you, don’t be surprised to see other fellow life jump-starters randomly learning sign language just because they want to, slack lining in the forests because they can and doing yoga on paddle boards in the lagoon simply because they feel like it’s the way to ‘be’ (mentally, physically, spiritually). There are no lack of options here for a tiny faraway island.

So, before you think of booking your next flight to go across the ocean for a new experience, ask yourself the following: when was the last time you did something different here? When was your last jump-start in Reunion?

Vocabulary

How time flies – le temps passe vite
gripping – passionnant
it’s no walk in the park – Ce n’est pas du gateau
plenty – assez
rewire – refaire

lack – manque
upbeat – optimiste
getting ones feet wet – essayer de nouvelles choses
carve out – créer

cog – dent
wheel – roues

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Getting High in Reunion

Since arriving in Réunion, my goal has been to see the Island from above. But I didn’t want to see this green gem from a plane, I wanted to see her in free fall and under my own parachute! I have been a licensed skydiver for over three years now and before I left the U.S. I discovered there is a skydiving club called Paraclub de Bourbon at Pierrefond Airport in St. Pierre. So I brought my parachute and other skydiving equipment with me on the long flights from San Francisco to St Denis.

However when I first arrived I was disappointed to learn the club was closed for a few weeks due to aircraft maintenance. Then when I returned when it was opened again, it was too windy or too cloudy. It took over two months before I finally had the chance to skydive in Réunion. By this time I was itching to get in the sky and get my adrenaline fix as skydiving is my addiction of choice.  Finally one beautiful December morning I drove to Pierrefond very early in the morning. The weather was good and the prop of the plane was turning, so I put on my gear and took a seat in the Pilatus Porter.  

From the plane I was able to see into Cilaos, past St Pierre to the south and Etang Salé to the north. It was a beautiful view! When we reached 13,000 ft (or about 4,000 m) I jumped out of the plane with my boyfriend.  Finally I got to make a skydive over Réunion!  We held hands and did some flips above the island before it was time to separate and pull our parachutes.  I was able to take in the beauty of the island in free fall and then under my own parachute, which I landed safely onto the small landing area next to the hangar at the airport. 

Finally, I got high in Réunion and it was amazing!  

Vocabulary

free fall – chute libre
however – par contre
due to – à cause de
windy – venteux
itching to – impatient de

hold hands – se tenir les mains
take in – apprecier

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How to get Hypothermia on a Tropical Island

Maybe this is not one of your life-long goals, but if you would like to know how to get hypothermia on a tropical island, then I’m your man. I’ve even done it twice. Now, it’s not easy. You have to be dedicated to the task, and not everyone manages it. In fact, this year there were 1600 people who entered this competition in Hellbourg on October 22nd, and only 5 of us managed to be in a state of hypothermia by the time we reached La Pleine des Merles. The other 1595 people had to continue, utterly disappointed by their failure.

Of course, I’m talking about my attempt to complete this year’s Mascareignes. A little backstory. 2006, my first attempt at the semi-raid: the doctors stopped me in Deux Bras. Hypoglycaemia. 2008’s effort involved a fractured sternum. In 2009 the doctors stopped me with hypothermia in Deux Bras….again! And this year, rebelotte as you say in French, with another hypothermia. It wasn’t very cold, but it was raining quite hard and my poncho was about as effective as a paper bag, and when I reached the first checkpoint I noticed both hands had turned yellow. ‘That can’t be good, I thought.’ And then the full body-shakes arrived, and my temperature plummeted to 34 degrees. The lovely docs stripped me, wrapped me up in gold shiny survival blankets and asked ‘Did you drink enough?’ Yes, I replied. ‘Have you eaten something?’ Yes, I replied. ‘Did you sleep last night?’ Ah. Apparently, lack of sleep can bring on hypothermia. It took 2 hours to get my temperature back up to 36 degrees.

Anyway, the real adventure began there. I was in the middle of a forest at 1900m, about 10km from a main road. How was I supposed to get home to St Paul wearing nothing but a pair of trainers and a shiny gold blanket, worn like some kind of glam-rock Roman toga? Together with another hypothermia champion called Catherine, we trudged upwards to the closest track, which was the Col des Boeufs car park. A cheery smile welcomed us at the little shop there, as the owner shouted ‘Losers aren’t welcome!’ Which was nice. But with the wind and rain I was too tired to get annoyed. But that changed quite quickly. Catherine ordered a coffee and a packet of fags (bizarrely enough) and I just said ‘listen, I just want a cup of hot water please, I’ve got hypothermia.’ The man handed me a cup of water, looked me in the eye and said, ‘that’ll be €1.80 please.’ Excuse me? ‘Well, a tea is €2.00, so without the tea bag that’s €1.80.’ And, as we say in English, unbef*ckinglievable.

La Mascareignes? Never again, I said to myself as we trudged down to Grand Ilet. But the next day, when friends asked me if I would try again, I said ‘Of course! See you next year!’

Vocabulary

twice – deux fois
manage to – réussir à
utterly – totalement
failure – echec
effective – efficace

body-shakes – vibrations du corps
plummeted – chuté
stripped – deshabillé
to wrap up – emballer
blanket – couverture

to trudge – marcher péniblement
annoyed – enervé
fags – clopes
unbef*ckinglievable – IN-CROY-ABLE!

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Grand Raid 774

The Grand Raid is always a special event when you live in Reunion, even if you’re not directly involved in it. You always know someone who is running, or at least someone who knows someone who’s either running or helping out. 

My husband often played with a music band at the start of the race, and we’d always cheer on a couple of friends, even if only online. We actually got married a few days before the 2010 Grand Raid, and there was definitely something special about that. I think we managed to save quite a bit on alcohol as a few of our guests couldn’t drink before the race. 

This year was extra-special though. My husband’s family came over from mainland France on holiday, and brought four friends along with them, one of whom came to do the Grand Raid! When we first heard about it we were a bit worried about whether that was a good idea. From what we’d understood – wrongly perhaps – he had trained mainly on the ‘Mont des Alouettes’, a 230m high hill in a town called Les Herbiers, in the French department of La Vendée. We knew that in order to sign up for the Grand Raid you need to have done some races in order to qualify, so we didn’t think he would be unprepared. But still, 172km with over 5600m of elevation gain, in under 64H! There’s a reason they call it the Diagonale des Fous, right?

When they got to Reunion, only a few days before the start of the race, there was a very special atmosphere at home. We found Guy very relaxed, and yet focused on the race. My husband and I found out that Guy was doing the race in tribute to special someone who had passed away some years ago. So there was this really special and loving support for him, and I think it was great for him to have his wife around, as well as four close friends. We slowly went into Grand-Raid mode, checking out the race routes about 10 times a day, working out when he might get to certain checkpoints so we could figure out where to see him, and so on. I actually couldn’t go anywhere to see him myself, so had the web-page used to keep track of the runners on our iPads ready to be refreshed every few hours. 

It all became very real when he went to pick up his number bib on the Wednesday. Number 774. Just a nine off 974! So off he went on the Thursday, and I have to admit that as much as we wanted him to succeed, there was a little bit of doubt deep inside, and a little bit of worry about whether he really knew what he was getting himself into, especially as we kept hearing about the number of people who had to abandon because of the weather at the beginning. We hoped he could get to Cilaos at least. And he did. Then we thought we’d be really proud if only he could get to Maïdo. And he did. I reckon it was at that point that we started really thinking he might make it to the end. And he did! We were so proud of him! And what made it even more special, although slightly strange, was that he came 774th, bib number 774! 

It was a truly magical experience for him and for all of us supporting him, and I’m pretty sure that special person he paid tribute to has something to do with that 774…

Vocabulary

Involved – impliqué
To help out – donner un coup de main
Husband – mari
To cheer on – encourager
Quite a bit – un peu

Mainland France – métropol
To sign up – inscrire
To find out – découvrir
Tribute – hommage
To pass away – décéder

Support – soutien
To check out – vérifier
To work out – calculer
Checkpoint – point de contrôle
To figure out – comprendre

So on – etc.
Keep track – suivre
Bib – dossard
Get into – aborder
To reckon – croire

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No Pain, No Gain

Back in February I had the brilliant idea of signing up for La Mascareignes, one of Reunion’s longest trail races. A walk in the park compared to Le Grand Raid, but nevertheless 70kms of mountain trails stood between me and a whole lot of personal glory.

Personal glory because when I arrived in Reunion 6 years ago, I was completely ignorant when it came to hiking and even more so when it came to trail running. Coming from a relatively flat city in Australia, and having parents who always made sure that school holidays were spent at the beach and not in the mountains, hiking for me equated to only one thing – pain!

The first ever hike I did in Reunion was in Salazie. The family with whom I was staying at the time took me there for a weekend, armed with a small publication entitled ’50 easy hikes in Reunion’. I’d like to stress the word ‘EASY’. Now, the walk from Hellbourg up to the gite in Bellouve, is by no means easy for someone who has never hiked before! I was about half way through the torture when I first lay eyes on a ‘raideur’. Lycra clad and going extremely fast, I couldn’t believe what I saw. I turned to my host family in a mix of confusion, disbelief, frustration and a whole lot more … “What…? Why…? What was that…?” I think I managed to spit out. It was then that I learnt about the madness that unfolds in Reunion each year in October.

My second hike – Mafate! The mythical Mafate that everyone spoke of. I couldn’t wait, although after my first outing in Salazie I was somewhat apprehensive. And rightly so. I couldn’t walk for a week after Mafate, but I certainly wasn’t left indifferent at the end of my 3 day escapade.

One particular memory that stands out was having breakfast at a gite in Marla. In the distance I could see a stream of people walking up the face of what seemed to me to be a vertical wall. A friend informed me that this walk was actually quite doable and that the mountain was called le Taïbit. And that on the other side of the peak lay Cilaos! I remember being in sheer amazement. There was nothing ‘doable’ about what I was witnessing. I understood quite quickly why Le Grand Raid was so aptly nicknamed The Diagonal of the Crazies.

How anyone could run or even walk for over 160kms was beyond me. And to do it over such demanding terrain, well, I was in absolute awe. With time, I started meeting people who had not only attempted, but actually finished this race! And more than once! Madness!! And they were just normal people. I started hiking more and more and to my amazement a weekend in Mafate gradually became less and less painful. The impossible was becoming, well a little less impossible.

It did take several years to finally understand what my friends meant when they spoke about the ‘enjoyment’ of trail running. I could never understand how you could ‘enjoy’ hurting so much. But when the suffering diminishes, it’s then that you are privy to the true beauty of Reunion Island – which for me lay far from its lagoons. Through hiking, it was as if I was able to discover Reunion again from scratch. And I was hooked.

Injuries have got the better of me this year, but before my time in Reunion comes to an end, I’m determined to be at one of those starting (and hopefully finishing!) lines in October. For me, the 3 races that take place at this time of year will always be somewhat magical – what a pity they can’t be filmed like the Tour de France to showcase Reunion to the rest of the world.

Vocabulary

to sign up – s’inscrire
a walk in the park – c’est du gâteau
flat – plat
clad – vêtu
madness – la folie

unfold – se déroule
outing  – sortie
apprehensive – craintif
stand out – marquer
a stream of – un flot de

doable – faisable
peak – sommet
sheer – pur
be in awe – être impressionné
from scratch – de zéro

injuries – blessures
get the better of someone – l’emporter sur / prendre le dessus sur

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