Canadian

It’s All About Balance

Ask my partner what his favourite sport is and he will, without a doubt, respond “Slacklining”. For those of you who aren’t sure what this sport is, you might have seen it on the beach. It’s a flat webbed line that is set up between two anchors (for example: two trees) and then individuals, such as my partner will then balance and walk across it, or try to do certain tricks such as sitting down with their legs crossed. But it doesn’t just stop there, there are many categories, including: highline (a slackline set up, for example, in between two mountains), jumpline (instead of walking across, the slacker performs tricks while bouncing on the line) and waterline (slackline set up over water) as some of you may have seen in St Gilles in front of the waterfalls.

When we first arrived in Reunion Island, four years ago, my partner would set up his slackline on the beach, which would result in many stares and looks of surprise, there just weren’t that many people doing it here. There were even times when random people would break out in applause when a slacker would accomplish a difficult trick.

As time went on the slackliners on the island formed a small community, which eventually grew into a slackline association. Nowadays when you go to the beach there is a slackline set up every 20 meters, and you see everyone from children to grandparents testing out their balance. However, many of the die-hard slackliners tend to stick together, organizing meetings, events, and installations, sharing a passion that they all have in common, that of balance.

Slacklining on the island has evolved, just as the slackliners continue to evolve testing slacklines that are more and more challenging, longer and higher each time.  Just last year a well-known slackliner from France, Nathan Paulin came to Reunion to break the Highline world record and crossed 403meters on his second try! He has since, broken this record and crossed a 1km Highline in France. Highlining isn’t just about the slackline, it’s also about the installation which requires lots of equipment and some rock climbing know-how, and there is also the mental aspect of getting over your fear of heights, the one time I tried a highline my brain somehow missed out on the “you are safe, you’re wearing a harness” messages I was sending to it, and I was frozen with fear, I couldn’t even attempt to stand up on the line as I was hanging on for dear life.

Connected to nature, the rush of adrenaline, working every muscle in your body as you attempt to fight the urge to topple to the ground, and just like many things in life slacklining is all about balance.

Vocabulary

webbed line = sangle
balance = équilibre
tricks = figures
waterfalls = cascades
to stare = fixer (du regard)

applause = applaudissements
to form = former
to grow = se développer
nowadays = de nos jours
die-hard = fervent

to stick together = rester ensemble
well known = bien connu
world record = record du monde
to cross = traverser
rock climbing = escalade

know-how = savoir-faire
fear of heights = peur du vide
harness = baudrier
to hang on for dear life = se cramponner de toutes ses forces
to topple = tomber

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Try to Come Back in One Piece

There are two types of tourists, those who book five-star hotels and spend their days sipping coconut punch while tanning on the beach, and there are those who travel to experience every last sensation possible. My sister-in-law falls into the latter category, and even though she is now a pro (having visited the island three times now), I will never forget her first time here.

She arrived with an itinerary planned out for her fourteen days on the island: Piton des Neiges, catamaran, the volcano, Mafate, mountain biking, horseback riding, ULM, and of course a little time to enjoy the beach.

Hike number one: Piton de la Fournaise and to add excitement to the hike everyone decided to jog all the way back, so as they jogged across the lava all of a sudden my sister in law lost balance and fell onto the jagged lava rocks, she was bloody and bruised but nothing serious.  The next thing on the itinerary would continue as planned.

Mountain Biking in Maido’s lush forest, since they were seeking an adrenaline rush, they didn’t bother with the beginner trails, and after a few minutes my sister in law was on the ground, bleeding from new wounds which were inflicted when the bike hit a rock and she hit the ground.  But like a champion (and without much choice) she jumped back on the bike and finished the trail.

The next day she woke up sore, and sadly Piton des Neiges was canceled due to the injuries sustained on the mountain bike. So, they decided to take it easy for a few days on the beach instead, nothing can go wrong in the lagoon… right? Wrong! More blood as the coral reef took its revenge.

So with all these dangers around us, we decided to get off the island and relax for the day on a catamaran.  The day was going perfectly, sipping coconut punch and laying in the sun, we were finally living life without danger! As if it couldn’t get any more perfect, dolphins surrounded our boat, and we tried to slip into the water without making a splash to get a closer look, when all of a sudden we were in the ocean surrounded by a pool of blood… Everyone immediately forgot about the dolphins and struggled to get out of the water as fast as possible.  My sister in law had sliced the entire palm of her hand open on the boat.

“Reunion Island- l’île intense” had really lived up to its name on this first visit. As she boarded her plane she had a few extra bruises and a couple of new scars that would always remind her of this beautiful island full of extreme adventures.

Vocabulary

to sip = siroter
to tan = bronzer
latter = dernier
itinerary = itinéraire
mountain biking = VTT 

horseback riding = équitation
to jog = trottiner
jagged = coupant
bloody = ensanglanté
bruised = couvert de bleus 

lush = luxuriant
adrenaline rush = montée d’adrénaline
wounds = blessures
inflicted = infligé
sore = avoir mal 

injuries = blessures
to slip = glisser
to splash = éclabousser
to struggle = lutter
to slice = trancher

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Beginner’s Luck

Often when asked the question “what’s your favourite sport”, I really want to answer “snorkelling”. But I have been corrected many times, snorkelling apparently does not constitute as a sport. I would be lying if I said that I liked swimming, I’m not really in love with swimming, and public pools gross me out. I just like seeing fish, and sometimes when I swim really fast it feels like exercise. After all, part of the definition of sport is: an activity involving physical exertion and skill. So, breathing through a snorkel without fogging up the mask demonstrates skill, and following fish around the lagoon completes the physical exertion part, so there we have it; my favourite sport!

With that being said, since coming to Reunion I practice my favourite sport as much as possible (since I didn’t have many chances to practice in my hometown Toronto) and I would like to think that I know the lagoon, especially in St Leu, like the back of my hand. I have seen octopus, moray eels, boxfish, lionfish, even squid!! I thought I had seen everything there was to see without venturing beyond the coral barrier.

However, my in-laws came on vacation last November and within a week of being here my father-in-law came back from snorkelling in Trou D’Eau and announced that he had just been swimming with a huge ray! I was green with envy, why haven’t I gone swimming in the lagoon with a ray? I jumped in the water right away and went searching for the ray.  But as luck may have it, I came back disappointed; the ray was nowhere to be seen.

A few days later my sister-in-law went snorkelling in St. Leu, while I stayed on the beach.  What a mistake, she came back excited telling us how she had just spent fifteen minutes or more swimming with a turtle! I have swum with turtles before, but not in the lagoon in St. Leu. I was jealous for the second time that week.

So, I started wondering why I had never seen these big magnificent creatures in the lagoon and visitors who have only been snorkelling a few times were finding them with ease? I came to the conclusion that either it can all be chalked up to beginners luck, or my in-laws were pulling my leg. They did happen to forget their underwater camera both times.  Ever since then, I have kept my eyes peeled, looking for turtles or rays, or maybe I’ll just have to settle for a visit to Kélonia or the Aquarium in St Gilles.

Vocabulary

snorkelling – palmes, masque, tuba
to gross out – dégouter
exertion – effort
fogging up – buée dans le masque
to demonstrate – démontrer

that being said – ceci dit
hometown – ville natale
like the back of my hand – comme le fond de ma poche
octopus – pieuvre
moray eels – murène

boxfish – poisson coffre
lionfish – poisson-lion
squid – calamar
father-in-law – beau père
green with envy – vert de jalousie

ease – aisance
to chalk up – engranger
pulling my leg – faire marcher qqn
to keep your eyes peeled – garder les yeux grand ouvert
to settle for – se contenter de

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Welcome to Reunion! I think…

This story goes back a few years, January 2014 to be exact. A huge ice storm had just hit my hometown in Toronto. I’m talking fallen trees, power failures in -20 degree weather, and sadly, people freezing to deathMeanwhile, here in Reunion island we were facing some troubles of our own as cyclone Bejisa stormed through, knocking down trees and sending huge waves through the walls of houses along the coast.

My little sister, eighteen at the time, had planned her first vacation. First long plane ride, first time seeing the ocean, and second real trip away from Canada.  She had two planes to catch, one airport transfer by bus, thirty-six hours of travelling and she didn’t speak a word of French.  She was leaving from a cold, icy, Toronto without electricity and the plane was set to land in Reunion on the third of January 2014.  As some of you may remember this was just after Bejisa, so I was desperately trying to find a signal on my phone to find out if her flight had been delayed and for how long, trying to bail the ankle deep lake out of my car due to a broken window, and waiting for the roads to open.

Finally, Freedom Radio announced that the mountain road was open, so we put down a tarp on the seats, so my sister didn’t have to sit in a puddle, and hit the road.  Taking La Montagne to get to the airport right after a cyclone was a challenge to say the least, crossing waterfalls, fallen trees, and electrical lines.

Meanwhile my sister had been waiting for hours in St. Denis, after a very long flight and a lot of misinformation, she had no way of contacting me and no idea what was going on.  A look of relief swept over her when we finally pulled up in our soaking wet car. She kept her eyes open the whole way home, commenting on how beautiful our island is! All I could see was the mess that Bejisa had left.

My sister can now look back with fond memories and remember her first day on the island, which she spent helping us collect hundreds of mangoes exploded all over our garden, sweeping leaves off the patio, and going to the beach to have a shower since we still didn’t have water.  And to top it all off, ten days after Bejisa EDF happily announced on the radio that there were less than five houses still waiting for electricity on the island, of course, our house happened to be one of those five but like my sister said “At least its not -20°C”.

Vocabulary

ice storm – tempête de glace
hometown – ville natale
power failure – coupure de courant
to freeze to death – crever de froid
meanwhile – pendant ce temps

to knock down – faire tomber
waves – vagues
desperately – désespérément
signal – réseau
delayed – retardé

to bail out – écoper
ankle deep – arriver jusqu’aux chevilles
due to – à cause de
tarp – bâche
puddle – flaque d’eau

to hit the road – prendre la route
relief – soulagement
soaking – trempé
fond memories – bons souvenirs
to sweep – balayer

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Carless in Reunion

Driving through St Paul at seven am, or better yet, driving to St Denis when the coastal road is closed and you are forced to take the winding road through La Montagne. I think these are the moments that make any resident of Reunion wish that they were home in bed, or riding a bike, or doing anything but driving in their car. In 2014 there were an estimated 336,000 cars on the island; that’s almost one car for every two inhabitants (and many of those inhabitants are not even of legal driving age.) That’s a lot of cars, and now, a few years later, I can only assume that there are even more!

Since arriving on the island almost four years ago, my partner and I are on our fourth car.  We sold the first one, broke the second one, the third one is still going strong, thank goodness, and I bought the fourth one just last week. After breaking the second car I decided to go without a car, I let my partner take the third car to work each day, and I stayed home. I was the literal definition of a stay-at-home mum. After spending seven months of being trapped in the hills of St Leu with an infant, I gave in and I bought a car.

If I still lived in Japan, going carless would be simple, hop on a bike, metro, train, or walk. But in Reunion living carless means riding a bike up huge hills (by the way, I live five hundred metres above sea level), walking on the road, since sidewalks are almost non-existent, or waiting forever for a mini bus with seven seats and sporadic hours. Not that I am criticising the bus system, actually I’m impressed at some of the roads that they venture onto. I was just not ready to wait in the sun and hop on a bus with my diaper bag, stroller, beach gear and new-born in arm. I chose to buy an inflatable pool and stay at home instead. But now that the pool turned green and my son is almost walking I decided that I needed to get out of the house. So, car number four is in the driveway.

Sitting in traffic on my way to St Paul last week didn’t feel so bad, even if the new car is making weird clunking noises, it’s all a part of the game. I have accepted the fact that in Reunion a car is almost a necessity. Unless of course you live along the coast, close to everything, but then you have other necessities… Like air conditioning.

Vocabulary

coastal – littoral
winding – sinueux
to assume – supposer
partner – compagnon, compagne
thank goodness – heureusement

stay-at-home mum – mère au foyer
trapped – bloqué
in the hills – dans les hauts
infant – nourrisson
to give in- craquer

by the way – à propos
sidewalk – trottoir
to criticise – critiquer
venture – se risquer
diaper bag – sac à langer

stroller – poussette
newborn – nouveau-né
inflatable pool – piscine gonflable
driveway – parking
traffic – bouchon

clunking – bruit sourd
air conditioning – climatisation

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Settling Down in Reunion

Louis Armstrong once said “When you’re smiling the whole world smiles with you”, clearly Mr. Armstrong had never been on a Parisian metro before. Unlike Paris, in Reunion if you smile at a passerby they almost always smile back, in Paris they quickly look the opposite direction. After eight long months living in Paris and with winter right around the corner I got that itchy feeling that I had become used to after 6 years of travelling from place to place.

What exactly was I looking for? Well, for starters I was enjoying the life of a traveller; living out of a backpack, seeing the world, as soon as I got bored packing everything up and choosing another country or even another continent to live for a few months. The longest I had stayed in one place was the year and a half that I spent in Japan… Until I got to Reunion Island.

I have been here for a little over three years now, which is a record for me! I have a garden, two cats and even a little baby boy, I am in every sense of the word, settling down. So, why did I decide to stay in Reunion? First of all, as I mentioned before I was struck immediately by the different energy between here and Paris, I really liked the laid back attitude, the willingness to help, and the overall friendliness of the Reunionnaise people. It kind of reminds me of Canada.

But on the other hand, it is nothing like Canada, the second biggest country in the world. I am from Toronto, which is the biggest city in Canada with three times more inhabitants than all of Reunion Island. Reunion is tiny! After three years of living here, I run into someone I know whenever I go to the beach, supermarket, even the bakery! I love this about Reunion, it is one of my favourite things about living here. I feel like I belong to a little community, but it’s still big enough not to get boring! 

Of course, I can’t forget to talk about how I fell in love with the weather. I don’t miss waking up an hour earlier to thaw out the car and shovel the snow out of the driveway just to get to work. I also don’t miss the five months of cold, on the contrary, I love the sun and warm weather, I love wearing sandals all year and my feet feel claustrophobic in socks and shoes now, I love snorkelling in the lagoon, and eating fruit and vegetables from the garden. 

Reunion is a little piece of paradise in the Indian Ocean. I am happy to be here and I don’t have plans to leave any time soon.

Vocabulary

to smile – sourire
passerby – passant
itchy – qui démange
to travel – voyager
backpack – sac à dos

to get bored – s’ennuyer
to settle down – s’installer
first of all – tout d’abord
laid back – décontracté
willingness – enthousiasme

friendliness – gentillesse
on the other hand – d’un autre côté
tiny – miniscule
to belong – appartenir
thaw – faire fondre

to shovel – pelleter
driveway – parking

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The Citrus Thief

A few months ago my mother-in-law came to visit the island, she found a nice house on the internet to stay free of charge, as long as she fed the cat and watered the garden. The house was located in Le Tampon, and the best part was the orchard. There were avocados, lemons, limes, oranges, mandarins, bananas and plants everywhere. My mother in law was enjoying waking up in the morning, picking some oranges to press for her morning juice, collecting some avocados for the salad with lunch, a nice juicy mandarin for a snack, and a few lemons to flavour the chicken for dinner.

This went on for about a week and just when she started to get into a routine she awoke one morning and all the oranges were gone! “That’s strange” she thought, since just the day before there were lots on the tree. Later on that day she contacted the owners of the house who were also quite surprised since that has never happened to them before. Well, the orange juice would have to be store bought from now on, which was not a big deal, after all there were still many other fruits left in the garden.

She carried on with her routine as usual, omitting the glass of orange juice of course, and lived comfortably for another couple of weeks, forgetting about the unfortunate loss of the oranges, when one morning she awoke only to realize that the citrus thief had struck again! This time stealing every last lemon! Now, if she were in Canada, she could blame the disappearing fruit on a bear, or raccoon. But, since this is not Canada and she can’t realistically blame the hedgehogs or chameleons, she started to ask herself: who was this thief and why did they want all of her citrus?

Unfortunately, this question would remain unanswered, but the garden was still full of limes, mandarins, avocados and bananas. In the weeks that followed the citrus thief struck one last time stealing all the mandarins except for one.. Which raises the question: why leave just one? Either the thief overlooked that one, or he/she started to feel bad for stealing all this fruit and left one little mandarin so that my mother in law could have a last drop of vitamin C.

In the end, there is no closure and this is a mystery that will remain unsolved. The worst part, is that the citrus thief is still on the loose! So, if you have lemons or oranges in your garden keep a close eye on them, and enjoy the fruit while it lasts, because you never know when it might just disappear!

Vocabulary

orchard – verger
lime – citron vert
to flavour – assaisonner
to awake – se réveiller
owner – propriétaire

not a big deal – pas un drame
unfortunate – malheureux
thief – voleur
citrus – agrume
to steal – voler

to blame – accuser
to strike – frapper
raccoon – raton laveur
hedgehog – hérisson/tangue
to remain – rester

overlooked – négligé
last drop – dernier goutte
closure – conclusion
unsolved – non résolu
on the loose – en liberté

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The Truth about Catcalling

Imagine this: you are walking down the street and you hear whistling you turn to look for the dog that might have gone missing and you realize that… Wait… That whistle was directed at you! Sadly this is not a make believe situation and this is a reality for many women in Reunion. Catcalling: the term which is used to represent a whistle, a shout, or a comment of sexual nature to a woman passing by on the street, happens quite frequently and in my experience, I don’t know any women who enjoy this type of behaviour. It is degrading, disrespectful, annoying, creepy and the list goes on.

This leads me to ask the question, why has catcalling become a common practice? Do the men who whistle, shout at, or make sounds at passing women find this romantic? Better question, what might these men hope for in return, and has it ever actually worked? 

Ok, so I am not an expert in this domain, but in my experience the most common response is that the woman continues walking (trying to ignore the comment) and the man waits for the next woman to try his feeble attempt at a romantic gesture. Best case scenario, the man realizes that this is not the best way to find a girlfriend and gives up on this technique.  Worst case scenario, the man really believes that this is a compliment and that the lack of response represents a sort of speechless admiration on the part of the woman. Which I am sure this is almost never the case.

Instead of making this Valentine’s Day episode all about why sexual harassment is never romantic, because lets face it, unwanted comments to a passing female is plain and simple: sexual harassment. Let’s talk about how we can make this Valentine’s Day romantic!

Step one: before whistling at a woman passing by, stop and consider how you would want someone to treat your sister, or girlfriend who is walking down the street. (Chances are that whistle will disappear).

Step two: tell those who are close to you how much you love or appreciate them.

Step three: (The most important step) respect, there is nothing more romantic and beautiful than respect for everyone equally.

After all, we all want to feel comfortable walking down the street, so lets spread love and not fear and remember… if you’re still looking for that special person there’s always Freedom Radio’s Chaleur Tropicale! 

Vocabulary

whistling – siffler les filles
make-believe – fiction
annoying – énervant
creepy – louche
feeble – peu convaincant

to give up – renoncer
gesture – geste
speechless – sans voix
instead of – au lieu de
unwanted – non désiré

close – proche
spread – diffuser
fear – peur

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Culture Shock

Back home we do things differently, everything from greeting each other to the food that we eat and all the little differences in between. These little differences that we don’t even notice when we are in our home countries play a big role in our lives when we travel to a new place.  In Canada things are a little different than they are here, which is why culture shock can have a big impact when traveling abroad, especially for the first time.  Culture shock can be defined as a personal disorientation which is felt when experiencing a different way of life. This comes from the contradiction between our accustomed way of life and the conflict in trying to maintain that in a new cultural environment.

Common symptoms of culture shock include: extreme homesickness, sleep disturbances, extreme concerns over sanitation and safety, stereotyping and excessive critical reactions. Since I have been living in Reunion for almost three years, I have begun to forget about all the differences that could make a visitor feel disoriented, however, my recent visit from my family has reminded me of some of them. 

For example, kissing everyone you meet instead of shaking hands takes some getting used to.  Also, language barriers can add to the feeling of being disorientated, and left out of general conversations.  In Canada even though we are used to seeing French written everywhere we are also used to always having the English translation to follow. When I first arrived in France it took me awhile before I stopped turning over every jar or label looking for the English side.  Another difference between the two countries is the culture of tipping.  In Canada it is customary, even expected that one leaves at least a 15% tip at the end of every meal.  Now, imagine the look of surprise when my mum left a six euro tip at a snack bar here.  One of the biggest differences though between Canada and Reunion is our definition of the word WINTER.  In Canada this means snow, slush, mittens, scarves, hats, and temperatures that drop below -25°C. So, when my mum arrived for winter in Reunion she was surprised to be wearing a t-shirt and see people laying on the beach.  However, as soon as the sun set and the temperature dropped to 17°C, my house seemed freezing to her. This is because in Canada all the houses have central heating, which means that the temperature inside rarely drops below 23°C and we can walk around in t-shirts indoors all year round.

These are just a few of the many noticeable differences, but what about the social differences?  These tend to be a little more subtle: facial expressions, gestures, social norms and customs which are all learned unconsciously.  I can still remember when I arrived in France four years ago, how uncomfortable even a basic conversation could be when I misinterpreted all the social cues that went along with it.  Basically, when moving to or even visiting a new country we must relearn many of our learned behaviours and the older we get the more difficult this may become.

How can we overcome culture shock? First of all it helps to remember that we are not born with culture, but we are born with the capacity to learn from our surroundings, and this continues throughout life.  Adapting to a new culture requires relearning what we might already feel comfortable with.  Learning the language of the country is a big help, this can be very difficult, but over time it is the best way to integrate oneself in a different culture.  Most important is to keep an open mind, understand and embrace the differences and this will help one adjust to all the changes they may encounter.  As Theodore Roosevelt once said “There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.”

Vocabulary

culture shock – choc culturel
travel abroad – voyager à l’étranger
accustomed – habituel
maintain – maintenir
common – ordinaire

homesickness – mal du pays
disturbance – troubles
sanitation – hygiène publique
shake hands – serrer la main
tip – pourboire

customary – coutumier
slush – la neige fondue
mittens – moufles
freezing – glacial
central heating – chauffage central

noticeable – visible
misinterpret – mal comprendre
overcome – surmonter
surroundings – alentours
open mind – esprit ouvert

embrace – adopter
encounter – rencontrer

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Being Vegetarian in Reunion

I still remember coming home from school one day when I was about twelve, having learned from a friend that eating meat could be a choice and not necessarily an obligation.  I proudly announced to my mum and dad at the dinner table that night that I had become a vegetarian.  Instead of the shocked response that I had expected, I just remember my parents looking at each other before replying “Okay”.  They later told me that it came as no surprise and that they had been expecting that day to arrive.

Growing up it was always a battle getting me to eat the meat that was on my plate, I would find interesting ways to hide it or to spit it in the toilet on one of my many bathroom breaks during a meal.  I didn’t like the idea of eating something that had been living and was now dead and sitting on my plate. As I got older the reasons became more political, but it always remained an ethical choice above all.  I would rather see a fish swimming free, or a cow grazing in a field than on my dinner plate.  I began to research more into the treatment of the animals that were being used to feed us, and was horrified with my discoveries, and that’s not even mentioning the environmental problems that are created when we support industrial farming

Anyway, I am sure everyone has heard these arguments before, and we are all free to make our own decisions, I made mine nineteen years ago, and have never looked back.  Being a vegetarian in Canada was simple, it is a popular lifestyle choice and there are veggie options at pretty much every restaurant. It wasn’t until I started travelling that I began to discover the difficulties in being a vegetarian.  I spent a few years after university living and teaching in Japan, and although it was an amazing experience, it was not easy being a vegetarian.  First of all, every time I mentioned that I didn’t eat meat, I would be asked a million questions “do you eat fish? Do you eat chicken? Do you eat pork?” and the list went on.  But even after responding to all of these questions with a big “NO”, I would often be served a dish with fish flakes all over it, after all if the dish is 95% vegetarian that’s good enough right? 

I will never forget the time that I discovered the “vegetarian tofu burger” at Starbucks in Japan, I was so excited to eat it, but the whole time I was eating it there was something about the taste that just wasn’t right.  After eating it a few times, I finally asked for the list of ingredients and sure enough it was 90% tofu and 10% pork… Great.  Needless to say, the easiest way not to have surprise meat in my dish was to stick to cooking for myself.

Now I am living in Reunion and although it is not nearly as difficult as Japan to be a vegetarian, I find myself faced with similar situations.  For example, the look of shock/disappointment when I announce to someone that I don’t eat meat, which is most commonly answered with the question “Then…what do you eat? ».  Also eating at a restaurant I am often left with the side dishes as my only option, even finding a salad without meat can be a challenge.  However, I do think that things in Reunion are starting to change, and there are even a couple of restaurants that serve only vegetarian/vegan food! My hope is that all restaurants will start to modify their menus by adding at least two or three meat/fish/seafood free options, so that everyone, not just the vegetarians, can incorporate a meat-free meal every now and then into their lives.

Vocabulary

necessarily – nécessairement
proudly – fièrement
spit – cracher
grazing – pâturage
industrial farms – fermes industrielles

although – bien que
disappointment – déception
side dish – accompagnement
however – néanmoins

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